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The ‘Invisible’ International Law in Cyberspace

Joanna Kulesza Opinions

Recent state contributions to the discussion of how international law applies in cyberspace suggest that the cybersecurity dialect of international law is losing sight of the mainstream – that is, how international law is applied outside of the cyber bubble. The fact that states contest certain rules and standards of international conduct when it suits their current interests and ambitions …

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EU Cybersecurity Strategy 2020: First Impressions

Patryk Pawlak Opinions

When it comes to digital and cyber policies, a message from Brussels this week is clear: nobody puts the EU in a corner. Faced with the growing competition and challenge to its way of doing business, Brussels is pushing back hard with concrete ideas to fight disinformation, to ensure greater independence from foreign digital giants and build a more cybersecure …

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Chinese Disinformation: What Should Be Done?

Rogier Creemers Opinions

Chinese-origin disinformation and misinformation around the COVID pandemic has gained greater visibility and prominence. However, there is little evidence that these efforts have led to greater support for the Chinese line in Europe – rather the opposite. Nevertheless, European policymakers should give some thought to strengthening their own social structures, rather than just complaining about Beijing’s conduct. One of the …

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The Future for EU-US Cybersecurity Cooperation

Julia Schuetze Opinions

While the American strategy of persistent engagement and the EU’s Cyber Diplomacy Toolbox – a framework for joint EU diplomatic responses to malicious cyber activities – could not be more different, they share the same underlying philosophy: the use of foreign and security policy tools to strengthen cybersecurity. Though their strategies differ significantly, the US and EU still have many instruments and strategic goals in common, which could be used to complement each other’s efforts.

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Time for Cyber Maastricht?

Agnes Kasper Opinions

In today’s information society, data and information replace the traditional resources for conducting war: coal and steel. Preventing conflicts revolving around these new resources demands greater cooperation and transparency. Until recently, coal and steel were critical raw materials for the economy and the basis for waging wars. It was coal and steel that brought European countries together in 1951 to …

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Do We Need an EU Cybersecurity Rating Agency?

Jan Martin Lemnitzer Opinions

As companies get ever more concerned about the cybersecurity standards of their suppliers, they are looking for a cheap and easy way to establish whether they can trust another company. Audits are time-consuming and expensive, but a number of new companies offer so-called outside-in cybersecurity ratings that promise to provide an accurate appraisal of IT security standards through a mixture …

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When Sovereignty Leads and Cyber Law Follows

Paul Timmers Opinions

The Network and Information Security Directive (NIS Directive) is one of the most important pieces of cyber legislation in the EU. Only four years after its entry into force, the European Commission is expected to table a revision of this cyber law by the end of the year. This is an excellent moment to consider this revision in the context …

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Privacy and Europe’s Cyber Leadership

Eneken Tikk Opinions

Although the US and the EU have been running mates in the international cybersecurity race, Europe has been a rather silent partner in this campaign. A recent ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) underlines the unique features of European cyber power. The Privacy Shield verdict is a reminder that Europe is not like Russia. It is not like China. And it is not like the United States either.

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Deterrence: A Naked Emperor

Mika Kerttunen Opinions

Researchers do not agree whether, when or how deterrence works. It is a risky policy that does not provide any predictability of behaviour, to which the European Union should not subscribe. The EU should instead develop stronger, multi-layered resilience in and for Europe. Such a policy would be protective rather than threatening, persuasive rather than dissuasive, defensive rather than deterring and active rather than opportunist.